gradientlair:

Treating Black People As A Consumable Good ≠ Valuing Black Life

Black and other people who protest the extrajudicial execution of Michael Brown and protest anti-Blackness and State violence themselves brought that protest to the recent St. Louis Rams versus San Francisco 49ers game. Of course they were met with everything from indifference/annoyance to outright acts of hatred because of it. I was so proud to see them upset that space though.

There, White people, many of whom are clearly racist (I mean…just watch some of the after the game videos posted all over Instagram) consuming Black bodies (and let’s be clear, how the NFL operates has a lot to deconstruct in terms of the use of primarily Black bodies; see Forty Million Dollar Slaves: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Black Athlete; and discussion of Black athletes in this context is not absolution of intraracial gendered abuse/crime) as a product, a good, an entertainment, but then during the game and after the game were confronted with the reality of State-sponsored Black death and what that means for Black people in America because of the nature of anti-Blackness. And some could not deal. 

It doesn’t take every White person at that game to respond as some did for racism to be real. Again, structural violence on Black people in multiple forms exist not only to the benefit of Whiteness but in part helps define Whiteness itself. Where “Black” is treated as diametrical, as the ultimate inferior. (And for the willfully obtuse thirsty for a derail, when you juxtapose intraracial crime with State violence, you’re suggesting that the type of crime that every race experiences between “citizens” becomes a reason to justify State violence on Black people, specifically. When you suggest a Black victim was “no angel” you suggest State violence is acceptable on Black people by standards only Whites can determine. Anti-Blackness.)

This thought about Whites’ response to the resistance during the game just reminds me about how I wrote about White consumption of Black culture or womanist/Black feminist scholarship is not proof of compassion or anti-racism praxis. And because of how White supremacy is socialized, there are fellow Black people who process White consumption as an “elevation” or validation of Black cultural production and think that’s something to be “flattered” by. It isn’t. Furthermore, Whites appropriating Black culture is not proof of valuing Black life. At all.

Black life is treated as non-human life and a “debatable topic.” What is a Black body but a buffet or a store or a meal or an object if the value of the experience of consuming it matters more than the intrinsic value of Black people..where only in the context of White pleasure does a Black person matter? 

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

allpowerviolencetothesoviets:

queenofmisandrists:

this is what happened today at the University of Auckland. four of us sieged the inside of Alfred Nathan House, the building which houses the vice chancellor’s office and which students are not allowed to enter, and four more students occupied the roof again. we had a rally outside, deep-frying student’s student loan documents. we did this on fee setting day to protest the fact that the university continues to chain students to a lifetime of debt by raising fees by the statutory maximum of 4% every year (and our own vice chancellor has suggested that the government deregulate fees so that they can raise them as much as they want), which locks the disenfranchised out of tertiary education by ensuring that they cannot afford to study and rack up debt.

good work auckland 

(via anticapitalistaction)

blackourstory:

DO YOU KNOW ABOUT BLACK TULSA? IF NOT… WHY NOT?

This horrific incident has been well documented, everywhere: from YouTube videos of survivor interviews to PBS Lesson Plans for school teachers. Please do your Google diligence:

  • From May 30 to June 1, 1921, white citizens of Tulsa bombed burned and shot up the “Little Africa” section of Tulsa FOR 18 HOURS STRAIGHT
  • Why would they do that? That same old lame excuse, a Black man supposedly did something to a white woman. But the real reason was ECONOMIC JEALOUSY. Whites may have called it Little Africa derisively, but there is a reason that Black Tulsa is known as Black Wall Street
  • In addition to the 300 Blacks killed, and over 1,000 residential homes burned to the ground, also destroyed were:
  • The Mt. Zion Baptist Church and five other churches; the Gurley Hotel, Red Wing Hotel, and Midway Hotel; the Tulsa Star and Oklahoma Sun newspaper offices; Dunbar Elementary School; Osborne Monroe’s Roller-Skating Rink; the East End Feed Store; the Y.M.C.A. Cleaners; the Dreamland Theater; a drug store, barbershop, banquet hall, several grocery stores, dentists, lawyers, doctors, and realtors offices; a U.S. Post Office Substation, as well the all-black Frissell Memorial Hospital. All told, marauding gangs of savage whites destroyed 40-square-blocks of Black economic and entrepreneurial prosperity!

64 years after the first bombing of an American city was committed against the Black residents of Tulsa… the second bombing of an American city took place in Philadelphia when the city bombed the black members of the MOVE organization. (see the blackourstory archive for details). 

Isn’t it a shame that 76 after the bombing of Tulsa, when Timothy McVeigh blew up the Murrah Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City, most historically illiterate Americans - including American “journalists” - responded as if it were the first time such a horror had been visited on Oklahoma. If only we knew.

While there are many lessons to be drawn from this, a few questions that stick out to me are these:

  • If the answer to Black second-class treatment from whites in America is supposedly to become the ultimate American capitalists…the ‘model minorities’… how do you explain Tulsa 1921?
  • For those Black folk who think that the sole answer to Black people’s problems is simply more Blacks becoming business owners and more Blacks spending money with other Blacks… how did that work out for our people in Tulsa in ‘21?
  • Considering not only Tulsa, but Rosewood, Florida, and many other thriving all-Black towns that you may know of that all met the same fate at the hands of murderous, envious, lazy crackers… WHEN ARE WE GOING TO ACKNOWLEDGE AND TAKE SERIOUSLY THE IDEA THAT BLACK WEALTH (ESPECIALLY ALL-BLACK WEALTH) WILL NEED TO BE PROTECTED WITH PHYSICAL FORCE?

There is a reason that Marcus Garvey AND Elijah Muhammad had armies of trained Black men as a huge part of their organizations. Many of us Black folk took those great men as jokes, yet NO BLACK LEADERS SINCE THOSE TWO have reached the same heights of economic and ideological success and unity of Black people. 

Not only do we need to LEARN THIS HISTORY, we need to start taking these events men and movements MORE SERIOUSLY, and doing some CRITICAL HISTORICAL ANALYSIS if we are ever to stop being on the bottom rung of every metric in American life. Not just some casual or accidental reading of history; some CRITICAL. HISTORICAL. ANALYSIS.

TULSA 1921 was real. PHILLY 1985 was real. Will it happen again?

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

msnbc:



"From 2006 to 2012, a white police officer killed a black person at least twice a week in this country." - MHP

Melissa Harris-Perry gives a heart-wrenching tribute to the deaths of black men that have occurred at the hands of police in the past decade.

msnbc:

"From 2006 to 2012, a white police officer killed a black person at least twice a week in this country." - MHP

Melissa Harris-Perry gives a heart-wrenching tribute to the deaths of black men that have occurred at the hands of police in the past decade.

(via ragemovement)

land-of-propaganda:

SHAUN KING’S SECOND BY SECOND ACCOUNT OF THE MURDER OF MIKE BROWN

— (Read his full article here) —

(10/15)

(via ragemovement)

micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.

Follow micdotcom

(via ragemovement)

Durham Anarchists Vandalize National Guard Armory in Solidarity with Missouri Rebels

ibooksblog:

Durham Anarchists Vandalize National Guard Armory in Solidarity with Missouri Rebels

cantwont

 

 

(reposted from anarchistnews.org)

On the morning of October 17th, the National Guard Armory in Durham was the target of vandalism intended to disrupt weekend operations at the facility.

We glued five different sets of locks in order to prevent the entry or exit of vehicles from the fenced lot, chained the front doors shut, and left a message on the brick wall on the front of…

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