21stcenturyprogressive:

We’ll call it, “The War on Drugs.”

21stcenturyprogressive:

We’ll call it, “The War on Drugs.”

(via america-wakiewakie)

lifeisliterallylimited:

NYPD twitter campaign implodes, flooded with photos of police abuse

Just before 2 pm EDT, the New York City Police Department called via Twitter for photos of citizens with its officers. Almost immediately the campaign #myNYPD seemed to backfire, as users flooded the hashtag with photos decrying alleged police brutality.

(via sinidentidades)

lillabet:

menagerieofchaos:

thefreelioness:

thelandofmaps:

U.S. Imprisonment Rate Per 100,000 Residents, 1978-2012

The US incarcerates more people per capita than any other nation in the world: Approximately 1 in 100 adults or more than 2.2 million people are behind bars in the US, according to the Pew Center on the States. In addition, another 4.6 million (or a total of almost 7 million) people live under some form of correctional supervision. 
Mass incarceration is not a result of higher crime rates: The US has the highest incarceration rate in the world not because it has higher crime rates, but because it imprisons more types of criminal offenders, including non-violent and drug offenders, and keeps them in prison longer. With the exception of homicide, US crime rates are comparable to other European countries with much lower incarceration rates. 
Mass incarceration disproportionately impacts US racial minorities: Mass incarceration has had a devastating effect on blacks and Hispanics in the US. African Americans are six times more likely to be incarcerated than a white person and non-white Latinos are almost three times more likely to be incarcerated, according to the Pew Center on the States. 
Incarceration hits hardest at young black and Latino men without high school education. An astounding 11 percent of black men, aged between 20 and 34, are behind bars. Much of the racial disparity is a result of the US’ war on drugs - started by President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. By 1988, blacks were arrested on drug charges at five times the rate of whites. By 1996, the rate of drug admissions to state prison for black men was 13 times greater than the rate for white men. This is despite the fact that African Americans use drugs at roughly the same rate as white Americans. 
Mass incarceration is expensive: Imprisoning people is not cheap. The average cost of housing an inmate is approximately $20,000 to $30,000 per year. This price tag comes at the direct expense of public money that could be spent on public education, medical care and public assistance. And it is one reason why so many states face fiscal crises today. 
Source

Okay, not to dispute that this is wrong and the such, but since this is based on a number and not a percent, then doesn’t it make sense that as the population in the USA grows, so does the number of criminals thus the number in the jails?

Population increase doesn’t take into account the fact that the US represents 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. It’s the highest known incarceration rate in the world, surpassing China, North Korea, and Russia.
~750 prisoners per 100,000 people is a massive number.

lillabet:

menagerieofchaos:

thefreelioness:

thelandofmaps:

U.S. Imprisonment Rate Per 100,000 Residents, 1978-2012

The US incarcerates more people per capita than any other nation in the world: Approximately 1 in 100 adults or more than 2.2 million people are behind bars in the US, according to the Pew Center on the States. In addition, another 4.6 million (or a total of almost 7 million) people live under some form of correctional supervision. 

Mass incarceration is not a result of higher crime rates: The US has the highest incarceration rate in the world not because it has higher crime rates, but because it imprisons more types of criminal offenders, including non-violent and drug offenders, and keeps them in prison longer. With the exception of homicide, US crime rates are comparable to other European countries with much lower incarceration rates. 

Mass incarceration disproportionately impacts US racial minorities: Mass incarceration has had a devastating effect on blacks and Hispanics in the US. African Americans are six times more likely to be incarcerated than a white person and non-white Latinos are almost three times more likely to be incarcerated, according to the Pew Center on the States. 

Incarceration hits hardest at young black and Latino men without high school education. An astounding 11 percent of black men, aged between 20 and 34, are behind bars. Much of the racial disparity is a result of the US’ war on drugs - started by President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. By 1988, blacks were arrested on drug charges at five times the rate of whites. By 1996, the rate of drug admissions to state prison for black men was 13 times greater than the rate for white men. This is despite the fact that African Americans use drugs at roughly the same rate as white Americans. 

Mass incarceration is expensive: Imprisoning people is not cheap. The average cost of housing an inmate is approximately $20,000 to $30,000 per year. This price tag comes at the direct expense of public money that could be spent on public education, medical care and public assistance. And it is one reason why so many states face fiscal crises today. 

Source

Okay, not to dispute that this is wrong and the such, but since this is based on a number and not a percent, then doesn’t it make sense that as the population in the USA grows, so does the number of criminals thus the number in the jails?

Population increase doesn’t take into account the fact that the US represents 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. It’s the highest known incarceration rate in the world, surpassing China, North Korea, and Russia.

~750 prisoners per 100,000 people is a massive number.

(via sinidentidades)

blackourstory:

If you really want to know what American Race-Based Chattel Slavery was like… ask the enslaved

Happy Black History YEAR!

(via america-wakiewakie)

abolitionjournal:

The Abolition Journal’s collective just got more fierce with new members Bret Grote, Emily Howard, Paula Ioanide, Lester Spence, and Harsha Walia.

abolitionjournal:

The Abolition Journal’s collective just got more fierce with new members Bret Grote, Emily Howard, Paula Ioanide, Lester Spence, and Harsha Walia.

america-wakiewakie:

"Decolonization in my heart and my machete."
— Oakland Street Art

america-wakiewakie:

"Decolonization in my heart and my machete."

— Oakland Street Art

rtamerica:

Alabama inmates plan strike against prison labor
Inmates in at least one Alabama correctional facility are planning a prison-wide work stoppage that threatens to bring production to a halt over pay and court conditions, according to an inmate who spoke to reporters from his cell.
The strike was organized inside St. Clair County Correctional Facility in Springville, Alabama by members of the Free Alabama Movement. The group – loosely made up of inmates at St. Clair and other Alabama penitentiaries – alleges that prison jobs initially designed to help fill convicts’ days and give them a sense of pride behind bars have effectively been turned into a kind of slave labor for Alabama officials.
“We decided that the only weapon or strategy…that we have is our labor, because that’s the only reason that we’re here,” Melvin Ray, a St. Clair inmate and the founder of the Free Alabama Movement, toldSalon. “They’ve incarcerated people for the free labor.”

rtamerica:

Alabama inmates plan strike against prison labor

Inmates in at least one Alabama correctional facility are planning a prison-wide work stoppage that threatens to bring production to a halt over pay and court conditions, according to an inmate who spoke to reporters from his cell.

The strike was organized inside St. Clair County Correctional Facility in Springville, Alabama by members of the Free Alabama Movement. The group – loosely made up of inmates at St. Clair and other Alabama penitentiaries – alleges that prison jobs initially designed to help fill convicts’ days and give them a sense of pride behind bars have effectively been turned into a kind of slave labor for Alabama officials.

We decided that the only weapon or strategy…that we have is our labor, because that’s the only reason that we’re here,” Melvin Ray, a St. Clair inmate and the founder of the Free Alabama Movement, toldSalon. “They’ve incarcerated people for the free labor.”

(via disciplesofmalcolm)